Tuesday remainders

  • “The little-known book by a well-known author is an old and charmingly dishonorable tradition.” (Who knew Graham Greene wrote a children’s picture book? Or that Martin Amis published, in 1982, a book called Invasion of the Space Invaders: An Addict’s Guide to Battle Tactics, Big Scores and the Best Machines, which now commands up to $400 from rare book dealers, but less from Abe Books? You can play Space Invaders here.)
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  • By age 40, the great Herman Melville “had essentially abandoned fiction altogether, tried publishing poetry with comparable success (i.e., none), and finally resigned himself — he was, after all, married, with four children and debts — to spending the rest of his life as a customs inspector for the city of New York. When he died, the newspaper obituary misprinted his name as ‘Henry Melville.'”
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  • AL Kennedy joins Louise Welsh, Alan Warner and other writers in writing love letters to Edinburgh. Except hers isn’t exactly loving: “Later, as a drama student, I learnt that Edinburgh during the festival only permits very ugly people to be naked, due to an ancient Calvinist regulation designed to prevent the spread of sexual intercourse.”
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  • Bob Thompson of the Washington Post reports on D.C.’s National Book Festival, which was surrounded this year by anti-war protestors (except those who were prevented from attending by sudden delays on the NYC-to-D.C. Amtrak line). Michael Chabon takes issue with the report.
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  • Peter Terzian sits down with 80 years of The New Yorker on DVD and considers planning the next 11 1/2 years of his life around reading every issue.
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  • There’s no equality in the British Library.
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    • Emma Garman reflects on the emergence of photos of Kate Moss’ cocaine binge only months after the model successfully sued the Daily Mirror for claiming she once slipped into a coma because she overdid it on the blow. Says Garman, “if rule one of celebrity media relations is ‘Deny everything,’ rule two is ‘Don’t sue a paper when what it printed is true.'”

     


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