Pamuk trial to begin

Tomorrow Orhan Pamuk will stand trial in his homeland for allegedly “denigrating Turkishness.” A Duke University professor who translated Pamuk’s highly acclaimed My Name is Red calls the prosecution “a harbinger for relations between the West and Muslim nations.”

In the current New Yorker, Pamuk says he’s unlikely to end up in jail, but discusses the larger significance of his country’s reaction to remarks he made about 20th century mass killings of Armenians and Turks.

The hardest thing was to explain why a country officially committed to entry in the European Union would wish to imprison an author whose books were well known in Europe, and why it felt compelled to play out this drama (as Conrad might have said) “under Western eyes.” This paradox cannot be explained away as simple ignorance, jealousy, or intolerance, and it is not the only paradox. What am I to make of a country that insists that the Turks, unlike their Western neighbors, are a compassionate people, incapable of genocide, while nationalist political groups are pelting me with death threats? What is the logic behind a state that complains that its enemies spread false reports about the Ottoman legacy all over the globe while it prosecutes and imprisons one writer after another, thus propagating the image of the Terrible Turk worldwide? When I think of the professor whom the state asked to give his ideas on Turkey’s minorities, and who, having produced a report that failed to please, was prosecuted, or the news that between the time I began this essay and embarked on the sentence you are now reading five more writers and journalists were charged under Article 301, I imagine that Flaubert and Nerval, the two godfathers of Orientalism, would call these incidents bizarreries, and rightly so.

That said, the drama we see unfolding is not, I think, a grotesque and inscrutable drama peculiar to Turkey; rather, it is an expression of a new global phenomenon that we are only just coming to acknowledge and that we must now begin, however slowly, to address.

The Literary Saloon has more information about Pamuk’s prosecution.


Comments are closed.